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Edwin Markham Archive

Edwin Markham, circa 1925

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Charles Edwin Anson Markham: Biography

American poet Charles Edwin Anson Markham was born in Oregon, spent the early part of his career in California, moved to Staten Island in 1901, and remained on the island until his death in 1940. Markham's son, Virgil, donated the poet's manuscripts, photographs, correspondence, selected books, and ephemera upon his father's death. Markham was a prolific letter writer and had correspondence with many important figures of his time, including Ambrose Bierce, Jack London, Carl Sandburg, Herbert Hoover, Amy Lowell, and Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Markham is best known for his spirited protest against the exploitation of poor laborers in "The Man with the Hoe", inspired by Jean-Francois Millet's painting of the same title. Published in the San Francisco Examiner in 1899, almost overnight it became a literary sensation. Markham had "sounded a trumpet blast of social justice," one critic wrote, for the poor and oppressed people of the world. The response was astounding. It became the single most commercially successful poem ever published. Translated into forty languages, including Arabic and Japanese, it was read worldwide and remains anthologized today.

Another widely known poem was "Lincoln, the Man of the People", which Markham delivered at the inauguration of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C., in 1922.

He published several volumes of verse, including The Man with the Hoe and Other Poems (1899), Lincoln and Other Poems (1901), The Ballad of the Gallows Bird (1896), and Gates of Paradise (1920). He also edited many anthologies of poetry. His prose work, Children in Bondage (1914), was a landmark in the crusade against child labor.

Explore a biographical entry on Edwin Markham (created by Dr. Joseph Slade, Markham scholar, Ohio University).

Access

The Markham archive is a closed stacks collection. Please email or call the Archives office for research requests.

Phone (718) 420-4352

wagner.archive@wagner.edu

How to Cite Archival Content

Please be sure to give full credit to the Horrmann Library, Wagner College for all content accessed in the Wagner College or Markham Archives.

Examples of proper citation of materials in the archives:

Correspondence

“Edwin Markham Archive, Horrmann Library, Wagner College.” Coolbrith, Ina. Letter, 23 March 1916, to Edwin Markham. Edwin Markham Archive, Horrmann Library, Wagner College.

Markham, Edwin. Telegram, 26 June 1918, to Secretary Baker, Washington D.C., War Department. Edwin Markham Archive, Horrmann Library, Wagner College.


Photographs

NOTE: Citations are automatically generated for content in our digital collections, just click on an item and you will see the citation information within the record.